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April 18, 2014
Easter eggs

By Richard Collingridge

As it’s close to Easter, I have decided to blog about Easter eggs – but not the kind that you eat, the ones which feature in stories, films, songs and drawings! They are a kind of secret hidden in people’s work, including mine.

There are several examples of secret Easter eggs  that I can think of:

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
February 21, 2014
Raking over the Past
By Nick Ward
“Please could you write about any family secrets that have influenced or featured in your work?”

 

I try not to deal in the real world too much, either in my stories or in life if I can get away with it! And family secrets are usually secret for a very good reason, so even if I discover any recent ones they might be too close to be used in a book. Apart from the fact that I suppose everything we write is a result of who we are and what has happened to us, I don’t think I have used a specific event from family life in one of my books.

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
January 14, 2014
Personal History and the Act of Writing

by Tony Mitton 

The story. The lyric poem. Narrative. Intricate thought process verbalised. They are spheres, bubbles, alternative spaces, places to be alternative to the world of everyday. Escape. Even if the scenario is real. At the most extreme, in make-believe, there is escape into a pretend world. And the psychologists will tell us that that pretend world is a way (like Jung’s dreams) of processing, of dealing with, the menaces and challenges of the real world (see Bruno Bettellheim’s The Uses of Enchantment for an early version of this notion).

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
December 27, 2013
A post-Christmas treat..

Here is a sneaky look at what Lesley White – author of The House Rabbit –  has been up to recently

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
December 12, 2013
Secrets and Shame

By Eleanor Updale

We’ve been asked to write about a family secret that has influenced our work….

My father was born 100 years ago, into a very different world.  His mother was unmarried, and so he was taken, as a baby, to the Foundling Hospital: the oldest children’s charity in the country.  He lived there till he was sent out to work as a trainee electrician when he was 13.  In all that time, he hardly ever handled money, went in a shop, or crossed a road.  It was tough life in many ways, but in others he was lucky. 

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
December 5, 2013
Guest Post by Richard Collingridge

It’s December and Christmas is coming so I feel like I can talk about my book, When it Snows again!

As some of you may know, the hardback was released last year to much critical acclaim (thanks for that :)).

– The book was shortlisted for the V&A best illustrated book award and has been nominated for the Kate Greenaway award.

This year sees the release of the US Edition, a French Edition and an Estonian edition (which I don’t know much about).
But I thought I’d talk about the UK paperback edition.

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
November 28, 2013
Writing and Family Secrets

By Simon Rae

I wish there were some! There may be, of course; but if so, they’ve been very well hidden.

Actually, I’m not big on family.  I come from a very small one – just me and my parents.  My father was an only child too.  His father was an old(ish) man when Dad was born and died when he was a young boy.  His mother (my grandmother) foolishly sent him away to a boarding school in London.  I, too, was sent away at a young age, which cast something of a shadow over my relationship with both parents.

Being an only child is often a talking point.
You tend to be pitied on the one hand, and blamed on the other – pitied for your solitary childhood (overlooking the hordes of small boys you shared day-rooms and dormitories with during term), and blamed for what is perceived as a self-centred (if not downright selfish) approach to life.

Of course, if you are an only child, it’s all you’ve ever known.

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
November 14, 2013
David Wyatt – ‘Not So Secrets’

By David Wyatt

I’ve always avoided using family members as characters in my work for fear of being found out; it would be awkward (for example) if uncle Derek discovered the evil Goblin king in a particularly grotesque illustration was based on him.

Friends, on the other hand, are fair game.

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
November 4, 2013
Everything Matters – SF Said

By SF Said

For this round of storyblogs, we’ve been asked to respond to Siobhan Dowd’s novella THE RANSOM OF DOND.  Given that Siobhan died so tragically young, and the book deals with the subject of death, I thought I’d use this post to talk about that subject – though it’s one people don’t normally like to talk about.

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
October 15, 2013
THE GOLDEN AGE OF IMAGINATION – BY RICK ROBINSON

By Rick Robinson

The Golden Age of Science Fiction, goes a famous saying in SF fandom, is fourteen. (At least that is how I learned it; Google’s autocomplete favors twelve.) In whichever version it is shorthand for an age range – about ten to sixteen, give or take, mostly give. Those were the years when I fell in love with what I love to read. And I venture to guess that this is true for most of us, whatever stories we love.

Yes, I always went for rockets and spaceships, but I really discovered science fiction at about age eleven. I went to the local public library to look for more animal stories by Jim Kjelgaard (Big Red). None were on the shelf, but my eye fell upon a book one shelf over, with a spaceship on the cover. It was by someone named Heinlein. I checked it out and was hooked.

Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
Random House Children's Publishers

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    Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers
    Random House Children's Publishers | One of the UK’s largest children’s publishers